Laughter & Connected Play

Audrey ThumbnailI recently came across this article about the benefits of laughter in a relationship. Although the article was about romantic relationships and marriage, the principles apply equally to your relationship with your child:

“Uniquely human, laughter is, first and foremost, a social signal–it disappears when there is no audience, which may be as small as one other person–and it binds people together. It synchronizes the brains of speaker and listener so that they are emotionally attuned…

Laughter establishes–or restores–a positive emotional climate and a sense of connection between two people, who literally take pleasure in the company of each other.”

In other words, laughing together is the quintessential connected play (or attunement play). My kids are partial to funny voices. What do you do for a laugh at your house?

* Other posts about connected play:

Play Is the Thing – Don’t Forget to Have Some Fun
Reconnecting After You’ve Been Away – Baby Play

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Please remember that the advice given on this blog is not meant to replace medical advice or the direct advice of a mental health care professional.
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